Metta “Loving Kindness” Meditation

This week on my YouTube channel Yoga with Haunani I shared the Metta Meditation, also known as the Loving Kindness Meditation.  While I do not know the whole history of this meditation, I do know it works.  I can’t even remember who I learned it from or where I was when this meditation practice was taught to me.  All I know is that it stuck with me and I have been using it for several years.  This was my go-to meditation practice when I taught yoga to Marines and Sailors at the Naval Hospital.  One of my favorite memories of sharing this meditation is having a very young Marine who was clearly upset before class, finish this meditation, open his eyes and say out loud as he was gently nodding his head, “damn, that really worked.”

In many ways, this meditation practice is really a blessing.  You bless yourself, another, your community or family, and then all beings everywhere.  It’s a simple practice, easy to follow, and effective. I’m writing the words out in this blog so you can follow along or print it out as needed until you have it memorized.

When repeating the phrases you can say it out loud, whisper, or repeat them silently to yourself.  A longer version of this meditation is to say the four lines out loud, then repeat at a whisper, and then silently to yourself.  Each time you say a line, take a moment to breathe in the statement and just witness what arises.

Prepping for the meditation:

  • Print a copy of the Metta Meditation.
  • Find a comfortable place to sit for this meditation
  • Remove yourself from distractions (i.e. phones, computers, electronics)
  • Connect with your breath
  • Give yourself permission to let go of your day, or your plans, to just focus on the practice

The first round of the meditation is directed at yourself.  This comes back to the idea that you must take care of yourself before you can truly care for another.  Or, you must love yourself before you can truly love another.  The first round is for you to reconnect with your heart.

MAY I BE HAPPY.
MAY I BE WELL.
MAY I BE SAFE.
MAY I BE PEACEFUL AND AT EASE.

The second round is dedicated to another.  At first, I recommend you choose someone who you are grateful for, who cares for you, is a mentor, or is an inspiration in your life. With them in mind and in your heart, repeat:

MAY YOU BE HAPPY.
MAY YOU BE WELL.
MAY YOU BE SAFE.
MAY YOU BE PEACEFUL AND AT EASE.

Remember to give yourself time to breathe in each statement.

The third round is dedicated to your family (blood or soul), your community, or a group of people you entrust.  Keeping them in mind, repeat:

MAY WE ALL BE HAPPY.
MAY WE ALL BE WELL.
MAY WE ALL BE SAFE.
MAY WE ALL BE PEACEFUL AND AT EASE.

The final round is dedicated to all beings everywhere.  You might imagine the World, a sea of people, or a symbol or concept that weaves us all together.  Keeping this in mind, repeat:

MAY ALL BEINGS BE HAPPY.
MAY ALL BEINGS BE WELL.
MAY ALL BEINGS BE SAFE.
MAY ALL BEINGS BE PEACEFUL AND AT EASE.

Take time at the end of the practice to sit and be mindful.  Notice how you feel at the end of the practice compared to at the beginning.

When you become familiar with this practice you can also use it as a powerful healing tool.  In the second and third rounds, you can bring to mind someone or a group of people who have hurt you, made you angry, frustrated, or upset.  By keeping that person or group in mind, you can rebuild a sense of oneness or connection between the frayed or fraying relationship.  Using the Metta meditation in this way may help to soften the hard edges of emotions and feelings you once had toward that person or group of people.

As in all meditation practices, allow yourself to be present and witness what arises. Try to avoid judging your thoughts or having expectations of how you’re supposed to feel or be during and after this practice. The Metta Meditation is powerful in that it allows the heart’s true nature to arise and release what it has been harboring at the conscious and unconscious levels.

Be kind to yourself and just allow this words to help you reconnect with yourself, someone you love, your community, and the World.

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Asian Medicine Wisdom for Late Summer

Even if you don’t fully experience the dramatic environmental changes of the Seasons, everyone knows them: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. Did you know in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), there is a celebrated fifth season?! Well, it’s not celebrated in the sense of holidays, Hallmark cards or other hooplah, but it is acknowledged as its own distinct time of the year and has dramatic impacts on our health if we are not mindful or aware of how it may affect our overall health.

“Late Summer” is known for the final days of summer when the temperatures are typically very hot, humidity increases but there may be a day or two of surprising cooler temperatures, as Autumn approaches. This time of the year is all about building reserves, like our ancestors who were preparing for long cold autumns and winters. Late Summer is ruled by the Chinese Medicine element of Earth. The Earth element symbolizes and is closely related to the organs of digestion, particularly the Spleen (a not-so-talked-about organ in Western medicine unless you need it removed) and Stomach. Because Earth likes to be warm and dry, the excess heat, or surprising cold, along with humidity (a quality of wetness) has the tendency to challenge our digestion system in Late Summer, especially if your digestion system is already prone to being out of balance, are overweight, or have congestion in the body. Since the tendency int he Summer is to party, be more laid back and enjoy we tend to eat more foods that can challenge our digestion system: frozen drinks, frozen blended drinks and smoothies, overly cheesy or oily dips, more processed and sugary food to accommodate the long road trips, travels, or BBQ’s like chips, hot dogs, soda, ice cream and cakes. If we don’t take time in the Late Summer to get-back-on-track, it is common to see the following ailments or signs of being imbalanced during Late Summer appear:

weight gain
lethargy
chronic fatigue
cloudiness of the mind
lack of motivation
feeling “burned out”
muscle weakness
flare-ups of chronic pain or injuries
exasperated fibromyalgia
digestion troubles even with no desire to eat or drink
feeling “ungrounded”

There is a famous, and misleading, saying, “You are what you eat.” After years of clinical practice and learning more about the digestive system than most (due to my own challenges with digestion growing up), I truly believe and teach my patients about the importance of “YOU ARE WHAT YOU DIGEST” (not what you eat). This concept was taught to me by the renowned International Ayurveda Physician, Dr. Suhas Kshirsagar, who has just released a new book The Hot Belly Diet. The difference is, you can eat as “perfectly” as possible but without the digestive fire and balance, your body is not necessarily benefitting from the organic, free range, non-gmo, etc. food. If your body is not properly digesting the foods and drinks you consume, your body is not sorting, absorbing and processing what your body really needs. Remember, every-body is unique with individualized needs.  And if the body is not digesting properly, or is out of balance, the mind is not properly digesting experiences and chronic mental and/or emotional stress build as well. Over time if your digestive system is chronically imbalanced, other organs, tissues, bodily systems and the mind begin to suffer. Our Digestive System is considered to be of the utmost importance when it comes to building immunity, improving overall health, maintaining weight, feeling vital and motivated and having clarity of the mind.

Late Summer is associated with building nourishment at the body, mind and spirit level.  If we enter Autumn with healthy, balanced digestion, strong immune system and clarity of mind, we have the reserves and stores to last through the drying, cold and harsh months (can be harsh mentally and emotionally–think SAD, Seasonal Affect Disorder).  Furthermore, when we are full, we have enough to share with others and won’t be as drained or get as sick, especially in preparation for the busy holiday season.

Preventative medicine begins NOW in Late Summer to build the digestive fire and immunity.  If you enter the Autumn and Winter with low reserves of physical, mental and emotional energy, you are much more likely to experience the reoccurring cold, flu, respiratory conditions and bodily pains of the winter.

Tips for Late Summer:

  • Begin to create your daily routine you’ll carry over into the Autumn with exercise, meditation, yoga, sleep, food, rest.
  • Visit your acupuncturist to get a digestion tune-up.
  • Movement: Take a walk after every meal.  Minimum 1000 steps. Ideally, until you build a light sweat.
  • Exercise: sweat at least 4-5 days/week, if not every day. If you feel more exhausted or lethargic after you exercise, you’re sweating too much, in Chinese Medicine lingo, loosing too much essential qi. Ideally, you want to feel energetic and vital after you exercise.
  • If you practice yoga asana, focus on the Prana Vayu of Samana, twists and wide-legged forward folding poses.
  • Meditation: Samana meditation, color yellow, themes: grounding, nourishing, filling the vessel/body, releasing the emotion of “worry,” feeling whole from the inside out.
  • Food:  Eat more warm, cooked, foods and beverages. Add ginger, cinnamon, turmeric, cumin and cardamom to your meals and beverages (even your smoothies!). Avoid icy foods and beverages, cold foods, overly fried foods, high sugar foods and overly processed foods. Over time, these will quell the digestive fire and throw your digestion out of imbalance.
  • Recommended food choices: soups, stews, casseroles, baked or roasted food.
  • Beverage: Twig Tea, Barley Tea, Oolong Tea, Chai, sip on warm lemon water throughout the day.

Spring Wisdom: Spring into Action

Aloha!

It’s been a long time since I last blogged but for good reason.  I am now a mother!  I have never felt so blessed, more humbled and more inspired in my life.  My intention is to share this joy and inspiration with you via more blogs and exciting offerings in 2014 and beyond.  Stay tuned (hint, hint, sign up for my blogs via email).

With that said, let’s get down to Spring business.

spring quote

Spring is the time for renewing your commitment to yourself, your health and wellness goals, your relationships and cleansing, a.k.a. Spring Cleaning. Why wait? Let the natural flow of the Spring season assist you in this internal process.

Spring is here (at least in Southern California it is) and you can sure tell by the awakening of all the senses when you walk outside.  The sun is up longer.  The baby birds have hatched and are chirping away…at 4am.  The smell of citrus blossoms and other spring annuals fill the air.  The mornings are cool and crisp rejuvenating the whole body with a deep breath.  The afternoon sun kisses the skin in the most sensual way that makes the whole body glisten with new life.  There’s also a lot more eye candy at the farmer’s market.  Noooo, not that type of eye candy (well ok, that too), but more vegetables and fruits to tease the eyes and pocketbook.

Even if you’re not in Southern California, or your Spring has not yet arrived, continue reading this blog so you can begin to prepare your body for the most healthful Spring yet.

Cherry BlossomsSpring is the season of renewal and rejuvenation.  After a long winter “hibernation” (check out my blog: Winter Wisdom) or slowing down of the internal and external world, spring is when the seeds of life, love and all relationships begin anew.  Like the new sprouts poking their heads up from the dark earth into the shining bright light, our bodies and minds are in harmony with the same natural process.  Remember, YOU ARE ONE WITH NATURE.  This is the time to allow the inner and outer self to start new, clean out the old winter funk and prepare the body and mind for a fun-filled summer.

As a clinician, this is the time when I begin to see more upper respiratory conditions (colds, cases of flu and allergies), chronic congestion, irregular digestion, pain conditions, unexplained weight gain, and other conditions caused by inactivity of body or mind (overweight, depression, lethargy).  These conditions can be understood from an Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine perspective.

In Ayurveda, Spring is dominated by the qualities of Kapha.  Kapha begins in late winter and continues into Spring bringing with it to the body and mind: dark, heavy, inert, cold, oily, static, soft and cloudy qualities.  This is why I don’t, do not, recommend starting “New Year Resolutions” in January.  There is not natural energy in your environment or internally to keep you inspired and motivated.  January is a time for rest, staying inward and being contemplative.  However, Spring is the perfect time to begin that “New Year” resolution.  If anyone asks, say you’re following the Lunar New Year calendar.

From a Chinese Medicine perspective, spring is dominated by the qualities of Wood, governed by the organs of the Liver and Gallbladder.   The qualities of Wood are to grow, be active, reach out, distribute and move. Subsequently, the Liver and Gallbladder have similar qualities of movement, cleansing, decisiveness, and regulation of physical, emotional and mental energy, referred to as “qi”.

We can integrate this Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine wisdom to give us a full perspective of how to stay healthy in Spring.  The natural tendency of the body and mind are to be Kapha in the Spring: slow, heavy and clouded.  Chinese Medicine wisdom tells us how we can balance these Kapha forces by choosing actions and foods that are more Wood in quality: moving, cleansing and rejuvenating.  Since the liver is responsible for governing healthy emotional balance, this is also the perfect time to release any stuffed emotions, resentment, anger or frustration making room for more sunlight (literally and figuratively) to fill in that space.  Kapha likes to settle in the chest, so it’s also very important to exercise the lungs either with more physical exercise, breathing exercises and chest opening stretches.

Morning Heart Opener

The main overall theme of renewal and rejuvenation of spring can be summed up into the common phrase “Spring Cleaning.”  Below is a guideline of ways you can implement Spring Cleaning in your life, inside and out.  Don’t worry about doing all of these.  Choose one or two and start there.  Typically starting with something external to the body (the last bullet) feels so good, you will begin to naturally feel inspired to make more changes more internally.

Ways to Spring Clean:

  • Increase your physical activity or change up your exercise routine to be a bit more challenging (length, duration or activity).  An invigorating walk or mindful movement practice (yoga, tai chi or qi gong) first thing in the morning will break-up the physical and mental kapha tendencies.
  • This is a great time to begin yoga since yoga focuses on strengthening the ligaments and tendons which are governed by the Wood and Liver energies.
  • Meditate daily: focus on releasing stuffed emotions, trauma, resentment, anger, or frustration.  To assist in this process, I recommend visualizing a green or emerald color light to wash through the body or fill any areas of the body that feel stuck.
  • Acupuncture:  Your favorite acupuncturist can help to move and smooth imbalanced Liver qi, helping you feel more balanced and inspired to live the life you know you deserve.
  • Breathe more!  This goes hand-in-hand with increasing your physical activity.  If you increase your exercise routine or start a new one, you will naturally breathe deeper and for longer.  First thing in the morning, step outside and take 10-20 deep, long, full breaths.  For those of you who practice yoga regularly, practice more invigorating pranayama like kapala bhati, brahma breathing, or fire breath.
  • Sweat.  Try to sweat at least 5-7 days a week.  Even if you can’t sweat through physical exercise or yoga (best recommendations), take a hot bath, visit a sauna or steam room.  You should feel invigorated after a sweat.  If you feel tired or lazy, you’ve sweat too much.  Take a day or two to build up your energy before you do anything strenuous.
  • Drink 1 cup of warm lemon water first thing in the morning.  Warm up 1 cup water and squeeze 1/2 a lemon into the water.  Chug.  Yes, chug.  If there is one internal Spring Cleaning guideline to start with, start here!  Sip on warm lemon water throughout the day for additional cleansing.
  • Eat in Season!  Eat GREEN!  Eat Bitter!  Other tastes to focus on: pungent/spicy (in moderation), astringent like grapefruits and lemons, and pickled items.  If you don’t know what’s in season, go to your local farmer’s market, or just read this blog.  Leafy greens, sprouts, and green veggies (artichokes, asparagus) are abundant right now.  For good reason.  The bitter taste in these foods cuts through damp, phlegm and thick mucus (all forms of kapha build up in the body).  Bitter also helps to cleanse the liver, the blood and digestive tract, allowing the body to feel more energized.
  • Recommended teas and drinks for Spring: Dandelion root tea, burdock root tea, milk thistle, peppermint, gao ju lang/Immortal Tea, Ginger tea, Kombucha.
  • Clean out your environment: closets, computer files, office space, bookshelves, collections and storage spaces.  If you’re having a hard time implementing one of the above suggestions for yourself, start with your external environment.  This will usually inspire you to feel better internally as well.

Spring can be a scary time for some people because spring is yet another time (like Autumn) for change and transformation.  Spring is the gateway to Summer.  Autumn is the gateway to Winter.  Especially after a cozy winter routine of eating hardier foods, enjoying the warmth of staying inside longer and sleeping longer (hopefully), Spring can be a love-hate relationship.  However, as Alan Cohen, states so beautifully, “It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new.  But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful.  There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.”  So I invite you to be courageous, clean inside and out, physically and mentally and allow yourself to be inspired by the renewal of life this spring. In short, be an example for others this Spring. Move your body and mind in the direction you want, not what others want for you.  Release anger, frustration or stored emotions in healthy ways like exercise, mindful movement, meditation, and yoga.

Note: Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine are constantly guiding us to find our balance in physical, emotional and mental health.  Balance is an individualized feeling and point of awareness that only you can truly know.  Each season allows us the opportunity to dive into different areas of our life to create a whole complete circle, or flow, of health and wellness.  By following the seasonal patterns of Nature, you can learn the infinite wisdom of how to stay in your own flow and balance.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is a reference work.  It is not meant for diagnosis or treatment and it is no substitute for consultation with a licensed health care professional.  Please visit your primary health care provider before starting new exercise or diet routines.  

Vata Dosha

You might be a Vata if variability and change are your nature. Everything from your digestion, appetite to sleep patterns is always changing.  Vata people talk a lot, walk a lot, and complain a lot.  They use their hands a lot when they talk as if they were talking with their hands.  They are good at attracting people with their talkative, expressive, and charming ways.  Very likable and sociable.  They are very intuitive, imaginative, creative and artistic.  They are good at writing poems, creating art, dancing and they love to travel or be constantly on the go.  Vata mind is just like a busy bee, constantly buzzing around (in circles).  They are born worriers, worrying about everything anything.  They are good to start projects but don’t count on them to finish it. They often feel anxious, nervous or worried about something in their life.  Many times their mind is in the future, not enjoying the present moment.  They are good at playing “what if” games.

Physically, Vata people are more slender and have an easy time losing weight and a hard time gaining weight.  Vata people have irregular digestion, appetite and sleep patterns. They can easily become constipated.  They also have tendencies towards dryness–dry eyes, dry skin, and dry joints.  Their dry joints and increased flexibility can lead to chronic joint pain.

Vata slogan is “Can I change my mind?”

Vata, which means “that which moves,” is composed of the elemental qualities of space and air.

The qualities that define vata are: cold, dry, light, irregular, invisible, mobile, rough and quick

The times of the year when vata is prominent are autumn and early winter.

Vata at a body-mind level governs breathing, movement, and discharge of nerve impulses, coordination of the senses, mental adaptability, and comprehension.

Vata is the first to change and is often called the “cause of the 100 diseases.”  Due to its variable and unstable nature vata out of balance can easily lead to illness and dis-ease.

While there are many remedies and ways to balance vata (stay tuned to my blog to learn more), here is one of my favorite teas to balance vata.  Drink it throughout your day if you believe your vata is out of balance.

Vata Tea:
1 C water
¼ tsp fresh ginger, grated
¼ tsp ground cardamom
¼ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp ajwan
Love & Grounding
Optional sweetner: turbinado, rice syrup, honey
Directions: Boil water, turn off heat, add spices.  Cover and steep for a few minutes.  Sweeten to taste (optional) & serve.

If you’re curious or want to learn more about Ayurveda, please email me or contact me.  I would love to help you understand more about yourself through the lens of Ayurveda.  It is an empowering form of medicine and framework to create long-lasting health solutions at any age or state of health.

From my heart to yours,

Aloha & Namaste

Pitta Dosha

You might be a Pitta if your main personality characteristic is sharpness.  Pitta people are good speakers, speaking to the point (no beating around the bush).  They are very precise, goal seeking, orderly and tidy.  Pitta people are list makers; they can’t do anything unless planned or they have a clear understanding or vision.  Pitta’s like to make “sense” out of situations or information.  They are always “on time” and don’t like to be late.  Pitta mind is like a bull: once set on the goal, it is difficult to change.  Present and in the moment, Pittas are generally witty and make good public speakers.   Opinionated, Criticizing, or telling people what is right and wrong (not afraid to use their sharp tongue), pitta can make enemies easily.  Because of their courage, wit, high energy, “get it done” attitude, and inspirational personalities they make good leaders. Physically, a pitta also has sharp features—sharp nose, sharp eyes, sharp facial features, and (watch out) a sharp tongue.  They are strong and have good muscle definition.  A pitta person typically stays about the same weight with only a slight fluctuation.  They tend to have receding hairlines, early graying, or bald early.  Pitta’s metabolism is very sharp and fast. They are always hungry and get upset or moody if they don’t get fed.  Yes, these are the people who get “hangry.”  Pittas get irritable or angry quickly, especially when things don’t happen their way.

The Pitta slogan is “Do it my way or the highway.”

Pitta means “that which digests things,” physically and mentally.

Pitta is defined by the elemental qualities of fire and water.  The qualities of pitta are hot, oily, acidic, light, sharp, mobile, and liquid.

Pitta governs digestion, body temperature, vision, hunger, thirst, luster, complexion, intelligence, and courage.

If you believe you’re a pitta type or your pitta is out of balance, you can sip on Pitta Balancing Tea throughout the day.

Pitta Balancing Tea:

1 C water
¼ tsp cumin
¼ tsp coriander
¼ tsp fennel
¼ tsp rose petals
¼ tsp fresh cilantro
optional sweetener: maple syrup, turbinado or rice syrup.

Directions: Boil water, turn off heat and add spices.  Cover and steep for 5 minutes.  Sweeten to taste (optional) & serve.  A wonderful tea for the Summertime.

Think you’re a pitta and want to learn more?  I love sharing Ayurveda and its wisdom with people around the globe.  Send me your questions via email or another social media outlet and I’ll be happy to get back to you as soon as I can.

Blessings and create a day you love!

Kapha Dosha

You might be a Kapha if soft and stable are your main personality characteristics.  Kapha people are grounded individuals and help to ground others.  By nature, they are the peacemakers of the world with their nurturing ways, loving attitudes, and sweet looks. They want everybody to be happy.   Kapha types tend to be shy or soft-spoken with delicate voices.  They are wonderful listeners and give the best hugs.

Amma

When I think of the perfect Kapha person, I think of Amma, the hugging saint. She is full of love, devotion, service to others and changes people’s lives with her hugs.

Physically Kapha types are full-bodied, well built (the most sturdy physical body constitution) and have more round features. Kaphas gain weight very easily, often feeling like “if I look at food, I gain weight.”    They have great endurance, stamina and a very strong immune system (the strongest of the three doshas).  Kaphas easy going nature can easily turn into being lazy.  Kaphas like to rely on others and prefer to follow others rather than take the lead.  Mentally, their minds are slower to learn but once they have it, they never forget.  They often think of the past or daydream about past incidences.  Kapha people get attached quickly and have difficulty letting go (physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually).

The Kapha slogan is “Don’t worry be happy.”

Kapha means “that which holds together.”  It is made up of the elemental qualities of earth and water.  Based on these elemental qualities, it is no surprise that kapha’s functions are to provide structure, support, cohesion, grounding, cooling, and lubrication.

The qualities of eath and water are: heavy, cold, oily, static, soft, and cloudy.

The seasons of Kapha are late winter and spring.  During late winter and spring, one way to balance kapha is by sipping on kapha tea throughout the day.

Kapha Balancing Tea:

1 C water
¼ tsp dry ginger
¼ tsp ground cloves
¼ tsp dill seed
¼ tsp fenugreek seed
optional sweetener: turbinado or rice syrup

Directions: Boil water, turn off heat and add spices.  Cover and steep for 5 minutes.  Strain and add optional sweetener. Drink in the morning and evening or make enough to sip throughout the day.

If you sound like a Kapha or want to learn more about Ayurveda, send me an email and connect with me.  I have a detailed questionnaire you can fill out to learn more about your personal constitution and Ayurveda dosha.

Oceans of love,

H.

Healthy Travel Tips

Traveling, whether for work or play, can be fun aaaaand incredibly taxing on the body and mind.  The key to maintaining optimal health, vibrant energy, and regular digestion is to prepare the body for travel before your actual flight or driving day.  I begin eating a Vata balancing diet the week before I travel.  For many, the stress begins before you even have to deal with crowds at the airport or traffic on the highway.  By the time your trip is over your body has tried to keep up with the stressful demands of travel and then it takes another week once you’ve returned to feel like you’re back in your “normal” home routine.  No wonder so many people love the idea of travel but find it incredibly taxing on their body and mind.  Follow these few simple tricks to make your travels less stressful and more fulfilling for body, mind, and spirit.

PREPARATION – the more you prepare, the less stress you have the day of travel.

  • Begin eating a Vata balancing diet the week before you travel.
  • Reduce pre-travel stress by planning ahead.  Make a list of all the things you think you need 5 days before your departure date. Go shopping if you need anything. 2-3 days before, and lay everything out.  See my Healthy Travel Essentials packing list below.
  • Print the Vata balancing diet and put it with your carry-on bag.
  • Try to get regular exercise, at least 30 min/day prior to leaving.
  • Prepare your tech gadgets for travel: Download any software, movies, books you will want for your trip.
  • If you love practicing yoga, do a google search of yoga studios in your destination.  Print their schedule, bookmark, screenshot, or save their website to your favorite note taking app.

THE DAY BEFORE YOU LEAVE – again, it’s about planning and preparing.

  • Pack your bags and/or suitcase (including carry-ons) the day before you leave.
  • Double-check your checklist as you pack.
  • Your carry-on should include: all the chargers you need, essential oil(s), chia seeds, book/reader, laptop/paper & pen, healthy quick snack(s) for the travel, scarf.
  • Check-in to your flight.  Screenshot your boarding pass.
  • Empty out your purse or wallet and only take the ID and credit cards you’ll use. Nothing like losing your wallet while you’re traveling and coming home to replace ALL the cards, saving cards, ID’s, etc that you didn’t even need while you were traveling.
  • Get cash (just in case someone doesn’t take a card).  Better safe than sorry.
  • Make yourself a healthy snack to take with you to the airport or car ride including your favorite calming tea, like chamomile, mint, Tazo “Passion,” or Yogi “relax”, or “Smooth move” if you get constipated.  Examples:  mixed nuts.  1 apple.  1 orange.  protein powder in a shaker (do not fill with liquid).  slices of swiss cheese and rice crackers.

DURING YOUR TRAVELS (planes, trains, and automobiles) – It is go with the flow time!

Meditating at the airport doesn't have to look like this.  Just sit in a chair, or floor, with the eyes closed hands resting on your lap and begin to watch your breath.

Meditating at the airport doesn’t have to look like this. Just sit in a chair, or floor, with your eyes closed, hands resting on your lap and begin to watch your breath.

  • Go with the flow.  Now you’re in the flow and most of the travel details are out of your control.  Avoid getting overly stressed, emotional or angry.  Perfect time to practice “letting go” and “gratitude.”  Check out my blog “Gratitude as an Act of Devotion”  to hear how my mom turned her seemingly horrible flight experience into a wonderful trip with free upgrades.
  • Drink WARM or HOT liquids as much as possible.  Warm water and teas will help to calm the nerves and keep the digestion happy.
  • Stay warm.  Ever get chilled on the plane?  This coupled with the stress of travel = a cold waiting to happen at your destination.  Always travel in layers and avoid getting chilled.
  • If you tend to get constipated when you travel, drink more warm water and tea and AVOID alcohol, caffeine and ice drinks/foods.
  • Take all the seated time to meditate, practice breathing exercises/pranayama and even maybe get some gentle yoga stretches in at the terminal.
  • Take the stairs!  Avoid elevators and escalators if you can.
  • During the flight or long car ride, take about 5-10 minutes, for every 2 hours of sitting to flex and relax different muscles of the body, especially the legs, hips, glutes, and abdominals.  Again, another great time to meditate at 35,000 feet…talk about levitating!

AT YOUR DESTINATION – Time to enjoy!

  • Continue eating a Vata Balancing diet as much as possible while you’re traveling.
  • Go with the Flow.  Refer to “During your travels”
  • Exercise 20-30 minutes every day.  A brisk walk around the hotel parking lot will make a huge difference regardless of how silly you look.  Better yet, do yoga asana in your room.  Check out my YouTube channel Yoga with Haunani for free classes.  Use the hotel stairs/emergency stairs to get a quick cardio workout.
  • Wake up 20-30 minutes earlier to get in a light stretch and meditation.
  • Reduce stress by going to bed earlier so you can wake up earlier to meditate or get in some light exercise.
  • An attitude of gratitude.  Today, we take traveling, work and family for granted (most of the time).  Recognize how lucky you are to be seeing a new part of the world, meeting new people (even if you don’t get along) and cherish the experience of discovering more about the world you live in.
  • Again, dress in layers and keep your temperature comfortable.  Especially if you’ll be sharing conference rooms with others, the temperature will always fluctuate to meet the needs of a variety of people.  Be prepared to stay warm or remove layers.

So there you have it, my travel tips on how to stay healthy and happy while you travel.  Life is full of unexpected turbulence (yes, pun intended), especially when we travel.  Travel is the best time to practice patience, going with the flow and gratitude.  May your next trip be filled with more smiles than grimaces and healthy digestion!

What’s in my bag every trip? 

HAUNANI’S HEALTHY TRAVEL ESSENTIALS PACKING LIST

  • Herbal tea (box or a few tea bags in a plastic bag)
    • Here are some I love:
      • Any tea that says “Relax,” “Calm”, “Meditate” in the name by Yogi or Traditional Medicinals.
      • Green or white tea.
      • Yogi “Smooth move” if you get constipated
      • Chamomile
  • Calming essential oil.  I typically only travel with one.  I choose the one that smells the best to me at the time: lavender, “clarity,” “calming,” bergamot, rose, gardenia, sandalwood.
  • Chia seeds – a must have for keeping your digestion regular.  I add 1 Tablespoon of chia seeds to hot water or tea during my flight and I’ll do the same that same night before I go to bed.  I also take 1 tablespoon every day while traveling.
  • Scarf/wrap or beanie/ski cap to stay warm on the plane.
  • Journal/Paper & Pen or laptop.  At 35,000 feet, I typically get incredibly creative.  Rather than try to keep things in my head for later, I write them down immediately.  I’ve written entire business plans on trips and have come up with many inventions.  Now if I could only find someone to fund those ideas.
  • A good book or reader with books you’ve been wanting to read but didn’t have the time for.  Now you do.

Optional de-stress items:

  • Incense (1-2 sticks) – careful if you get a non-smoking room
  • 1 candle – careful if you’re traveling to hot weather, you don’t want your candle to melt on your stuff.
  • yoga mat – there are several travel yoga mats on the market or even yogi toes.  I no longer travel with a mat and choose to just use a hotel towel or find a grassy space where I can find one.  In the end, mat or no mat, I don’t let it stop me from practicing.

 

Oceans of love and happy travels!

Aloha & Namaste

Six Tastes of Ayurveda

At the age of five, maybe even earlier, I was often plagued by stomach aches.  It mostly happened after I ate.  My parents, relatively western in their ways, did what any suburban middle-class parents would do, they took me to my pediatrician.  I loved my Pediatrician.  She was untouchable to me.  It was so cool when she used a tongue depressor that was individually wrapped.  I loved the pink syrup she gave me when I had sore throats and I loved looking through the drawers in my waiting room while I waited for the doctor.  Unfortunately, despite her coolness factor, my stomach aches continued.  There was no definite diagnosis and only some mention after an allergy test that I might be lactose intolerant.  The tiny purple pill which was brand-spanking-new on the market (now one of Pharmaceuticals top sellers, Prilosec) didn’t even help.  I did do a little bit better with lactose-free milk but ice cream, cheese, pizza, and all those yummy kids foods always made me sick and were out of the question.

In my teens, my stomach aches got worst and worst.  After a trip to France, where I had very little stomach issues even eating their stinky cheese, I returned stateside with horrible cramping stomach aches.  After several mildly invasive tests, I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.  They told me it was a newer diagnosis that was just being used.   The doctor told me, “Eat what you can and avoid the things that give you an upset stomach.”  Duuuuuuuuhhhh!  That’s what I was doing.  Eating rice and apple juice.  Do you think I would have spent my time coming to you if I didn’t already know that?!  I was frustrated.

About the same time, my mom had picked up a book from a garage sale and gave it to me saying, “I think this is for you.”  The title was Yoga and Ayurveda by David Frawley.  I had nooooooo idea what yoga or Ayurveda was (neither did my mom) but when I randomly opened it up, I saw charts of foods.  With a quick scan, I discovered a book that discussed food as medicine.  I began reading hastily.  Within days I was learning that people had different body constitutions and foods reacted differently to different people.  This all made perfect sense to me.  It was like a lightbulb turned-on, one that was familiar yet so new.  I felt like I finally found hope for reducing my stomach upset.  That was the beginning of my love affair with Ayurveda.  I still had no idea what yoga was and it would be another three years before I took my first asana yoga class.

Ayurveda is a complete system of medicine.  Where biomedicine treats diseases with biomedical pharmaceuticals and surgery, Ayurveda prefers to use food, spices, lifestyle modifications, exercise, meditation, aromatherapy, mantra, manual therapies like massage and herbal formulas, or surgery in severe illness or disease.  Ayurveda’s focus is on establishing and maintaining health and wellness in order to prevent disease.

Hippocrates Food MedicineWhile many people believe Hippocrates coined the term “food is medicine,” this is actually an old Ayurveda saying that dates back thousands of years prior to Hippocrates.  Food is such a key component to health and wellness because we eat several times a day.  Ayurveda has dissected food to a science.  The reason why food is medicine is because what we put in our mouths has tastes that trigger our digestive system to begin working and a post-digestive effect.  Each taste stimulates a different part of the tongue which sends signals to the digestive system to ramp up for ingestion and begin producing the right enzymes to digest the incoming food or beverage.  Furthermore, Ayurveda explains how each taste has a medicinal value based on its qualities and properties.  It’s these elemental properties that act on the body in a myriad of ways to create balance, cleansing, healing or even imbalances.

To date, I know of no other culture or medicine that looks at food and tastes so closely.  This is different from the western idea of nutrient and vitamin values.  Nutrients and values are just labels but do not explain why they do what they do to the body.  Ayurveda does.  Ayurveda explains the why’s of food as medicine.  Of all the years I’ve been studying Ayurveda (over 16 years now) I am still fascinated by the science of food and the six tastes.

I’ve compiled a quick .pdf (Six tastes handout) for you to look at which gives a more detailed description of the six tastes and how they affect the body.  If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask.  I’m pretty obsessed about Oriental Medicine and geek out over this stuff all the time.  So if you have any questions, seriously, please ask.

Create a day you LOVE!

Aloha & Namaste

 

Asian Medicine Wisdom for Autumn

It’s Autumn which means several things in my world.  Autumn is a wonderful transitional season.  The mornings begin to have a nice crisp in the air once again that just screams to the lungs…Wake up!   And as soon as I take in a deep breath, my body responds with AAAAH!  Oh Autumn, how I love thee.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, a.k.a TCM, Autumn is correlated to the element of Metal.  For all you non-TCM geeks, without even having to try to figure out what that means just consider what the qualities of metal are.  Don’t give yourself an aneurysm thinking about it.  Just consider.  Let me get you started.  Metal is ___(fill in adjective here)______________.  Voila!  Now you can begin to relate to the season of Autumn more personally.  Consider how these qualities apply to your own life, your relationships, mental state, habits, or more importantly how you can use these qualities to bring more balance in your life, i.e. cutting things out of your life that no longer serve you or help you to be the best you can be.

Yes, Autumn, as metal, is more sharp or cutting than the playful energy of summer.  Things all around us begin to show their life’s cycle: wilting, withering, changing colors, falling off trees.  Woah woah waoh, not to get you depressed.  This is a natural cycle and part of your own nature of being.  Asian Medicine is all about celebrating the nature of things and since YOU ARE A PART OF nature, this means celebrating YOU!  This is the perfect time to allow what needs to naturally die away, go.  Let go.  The nature of Metal.  AND when we let go, that creates space allowing for the opposite to occur…receptivity or filling.

More TCM geeky stuff that you should know is the metal element is connected with the Lungs and Large Intestine.  The yin and yang organs of receptivity and letting go.  These images and connections become the perfect guidelines for the natural processes in our own life, no?

In Ayurveda, Autumn is associated with the dosha, or imbalances, of Vata.  Vata is represented by the elements of Air and Space just like the Lungs and Large Intestine.  In fact, the house of Vata is the…drum roll please…Large Intestine.  Coincidence?  Never is.  More like Divine connection!  At this time of the year, it is natural for things in our lives to become irregular, mobile, quick, dry, cold, light, and rough.  Not just on a physical level (lungs and large intestine) but at the mental/emotional level as well.  Both TCM and Ayurveda give us guidelines of how to live with the seasons and not allow these qualities to take over too much and create dis-ease or illness.

During the change of the seasons, Vata, the energy of movement, is predominant. It’s important to avoid excesses in all areas of your life at this time.  Breathing exercises and meditation are important to practice every day.  Begin packing a scarf or top-layer with you every time you leave the house, just in case the weather shifts.  When the weather gets windy, protect your neck.  Most importantly, nurture moderation and stress-free living to keep the immune system functioning at its peak performance.

General food guidelines to follow at this time of the year include:
1) Eat foods that are sweet (whole grains, not cookies), sour & salty (rock salt, not potato chips)
2) Limit the intake of spicy, raw, cold, and light foods. i.e. cold salads, sushi, and cold bean salads.
3) Enjoy warm, cooked foods, a variety of proteins, and healthy fats.

Consider, sipping on the following Vata Balancing Tea throughout the day to help make the transition of the seasons easier on the mind and body.

Ingredients:
1C water
3 deep breaths
1 Intention of “Balance”
1/4 tsp fresh ginger, grated
1/4 tsp ground cardamom
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ajwain (available at most local Natural Food store)
sweetener (optional): turbinado, rice syrup

Directions:
Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat and add spices. Cover and steep, or use a coffee/tea press, for 3-5 minutes. Sweeten to taste & serve. Serves 1.

Enjoy with balance and the intention of letting go those things in your life (thoughts, habits, relationships) that no longer serve you while being more receptive, or filling your life with things that DO serve you. This is Autumn! Enjoy.

Aloha & Namaste

To learn more specifically about your personal constitution and what foods, spices, beverages, breathing exercises and physical exercises or yoga asana are best to bring your body and mind into balance, call or e-mail Haunani today to schedule your private 1-to-1 session.