Computer Age or Human Age?

Another blog I wrote on February 15, 2008.  It seems just as relevant now as before, except technology has advanced to the nth degree.  May you find some “aha” moments nonetheless.

Ancient Wisdom reminds us, “what we see on the outside is a direct mirror reflection of the inside.

I sat on a Friday night, tonight, February 15, 2008, thinking about this concept.

As a yogi, I find myself in deep contemplation often.  Where most of my peers in their late 20’s are off drinking at a bar, dancing, or getting ready for the night at 8:30 pm, I’m already preparing for bed.  I’d rather wake early to the sound of silence then stay out late in the sound of chaos.  Back to the point, so here I am Friday night reflecting on how the outside world is TRULY a direct reflection of the inside world of us, each human being.

I began to marvel at how wonderful the Internet and E-mail system has become.  How amazingly fast and efficient it is.  Click click click and I have a whole dissertation sent across the globe.  Click Click Click and I have music produced by a friend in France playing on my computer.  WOW!

Continuing to read Jeffrey Armstrong’s newest book Karma, The Ancient Science of Cause and Effect it became so clear and obvious to me how the Computer Age is truly a direct reflection in EVERY WAY of the current Human Age.

The Internet, or inner-net, of energy frequencies and bundles of energy and information streaming through space and time, from our home computers and from our computers we call bodies.  Information sent from one place to another, communicating long distances from brain to foot, foot to brain in milliseconds.  The Internet, aka “the Web”, is a direct reflection of the internal web within us.  The web of energy channels, nadis, (72,000 in all), acupressure meridians, energy points like satellites or signal receivers, vortexes of swirling energy that concentrate energy into particular areas.  The Web is our web.  We can take this one step further to extend our computer based Internet Web to that of the Web of Consciousness of All That Is.  The omnipresent Web of Consciousness that knows All and is available to anyone who chooses to tap into its frequencies…sound familiar to computer talk?

In October of 2005 I took a Healing course called Total Body Modification.  Although I never became a proficient practitioner of it, mostly because it was like learning HTML Coding (something I didn’t want to invest my energy into at the time), I definitely understood and believed the profound healing impact it had on the human bodies (physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual).  Not only because it made sense to me but also because I could feel and experience the healing that took place when it was done on me.  Throughout this training the body was continually being compared to a computer.  Our physical body was the hard drive, the brain the internal processor, the heart the software, conductors and silicon connectors our energy channels.  It made perfect sense in a not so traditional way.  I got it.  How simple I thought, if a person can understand computers and their workings, they can understand the human body.  If they can take apart and put a computer back together, they could probably be an incredible healer.  Of course, in the back of my mind this gave me hope that my computer engineer brother who has been calling me his “hippy sister who’s gone woo-wooo” might come around to “get” me when he heard this correlation.  Like I said, after that weekend training, I used TBM on a few people while the language and protocols were fresh in my mind.  But after awhile, like learning a foreign language, I didn’t use it and I began to lose the language.

But a major lesson was learned and a new paradigm of looking at the human body and its healing capabilities understood.  Here, two years later on this beautiful Friday night I began to understand TBM in a deeper light, with greater appreciation.

If we continue to look at our external world as a direct reflection of our inner-world, we can also understand more of our human evolution in the past ten to twenty years.  Most importantly how quickly we are evolving as a species, consciously and unconsciously.  Consciously it is very easy to see how quickly technology, especially the computer industry, has evolved.  It was just ten years ago that the Internet had entered the public school systems.  Twenty years ago, I remember our school opened its first computer lab.  Dot matrix screens with green or orange print, dot matrix printers, and the only game available was Frogger or Oregon Trail.  The Internet wasn’t even an everyday word until I was in high school.  Even then, most home computers were on dial-up modems.  Remember when it would take 5-10 minutes for your computer to warm-up and dial-in?

Today, we are seeing faster, smaller, more powerful computers every month.  Not only is the hardware advancing but the software is becoming more complicated, more user friendly, and the diversity of programs is unthinkable as to ten years ago.  Computer viruses are becoming more prevalent, harder to track and able to destroy more information than ever before.  Sound familiar?  Our bodies are two upgrading, adapting, taking on more energy and changes than every before.  And like the Apple vs. IBM debate as to “stick with what I know computer” and not try the new one, we fight ourselves and deny change even if the other “sounds just as good.”  Internally struggling to stay with the comfort zone of what I “know,” refusing to even consider changing to another computer or different lifestyle.  In the process creating more stress or denying the inevitable change, becoming attached to something that is being outdated, thus our software systems begin to show signs of wear and tear…cancer, hypertension, migraine headaches, repetitive injuries.  We are definitely in a mirroring stage of existence.

While viruses become more and more ramped, at the same time the anti-virus programs, firewalls, computers that filter Junk and pop-ups are also growing at an astounding rate to keep up with the “negative” aspects of computers.  As a “healer” I can see a direct reflection of the number of Healers who have come out of their closet to step into their role as a healer in the past five to ten years.  Different modalities, creative, intuitive, channeled, and integrative methods of healing the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual body spring up every week.  They all work, and like anti-virus software, are becoming more and more powerful against the unforeseen virus.  Becoming more preventative in nature rather than curative.

Another direct reflection of the Computer World as our own is the ongoing struggle between choosing to stick with our old computer systems that we grew up with or adapting new systems that are unknown but sound more reliable, efficient, and virus proof.  Where some people take the leap of faith of buying a new computer and totally different computing system without even thinking twice, typically the switch from IBM to Apple (a more virus preventative computer), there are those who still hold on with a strong hold to what they know because they don’t want to have to go through learning something new or changing what already “works” for them.  Again, does this sound familiar to our conscious evolving (or not evolving) groups of society?  Some people quickly adapting to change while there are those who refuse to think outside the old paradigm box of what makes them comfortable.  A critical difference, once again reflected in our growing computer world, is that we can’t deny the change any longer.  It’s happening whether we want it to or not.

Consciously we can see, even in our economic market, that computers, their workings, software, and components are changing faster than ever.  Our bodies, physical, mental, emotional, spiritual bodies are ALSO changing faster than ever.  At an unconscious level, the computer industry may think they are working to keep up with developing technology, but perhaps technology is attempting to keep up with changing and evolving human consciousness?  My altruism holds faith in the later.  They are one and the same, a direct reflection of each other.

At this critical, burgeoning time of human consciousness, we can choose to hold on and refuse to change to a new hardware, operating system, processor, and software because we fear change, the unknown and we’ve become to complacent and comfortable to learn something new thereby inducing stress, virus, and other conditions or dis-eases of our computing systems.  Or we can take a step towards the unknown, go with the flow of change and ask for an upgraded operating system, processor, and software that keep us up to date with the ever expanding possibilities thereby reducing undue stress and dis-ease in the body.  How do you want to live?  It’s up to you.

Going back to where this whole article began, if the outside world is a direct reflection of our inside world, what else can we learn about ourselves as evolving spirits on planet earth if we look outside?  Are you destroying yourself like our environment?  How much pollution and carbon emissions are you filling your body with or are you choosing new ways of living that reduce these chemical toxins?  Are you choosing to live and support spraying your food with toxic chemicals and pesticides the same way you spray your internal organs with pharmaceuticals and drugs?  Are you recycling because it makes you look good from the outside and it’s the fad thing to do, the way you try to do the new fad diet or health conscious trip because it makes you look like you care form the outside?  How do you really feel on the inside?  What steps are you truly living because you believe in it versus the things you do because it makes you look good?

Remember our outer world is a direct reflection of our inner-world.  I challenge you to look at the outside life in this manner and than reflect on your inner-self.  See a resemblance?  If not, it was fun to consider this point of view and to write this article.  You read this far, which means something caught your attention and I thank you for your precious time.  For those who have read this article and truly “get it” I thank you too for your time.  May our ever-changing world continue to inspire us to “Be the change we wish to see in the World.”

Aloha & Namaste

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The Synergy of Yoga and Ayurveda

 

For thousands of years*, Yoga and Ayurveda have been used to heal, transform and balance the human body, mind, and thus, Spirit. Through globalization, both have spread worldwide assisting people in reclaiming their health and well-being by promoting daily practices to create health, rather than relying on a magic pill.  Both systems were suppressed in India during the British occupation but continued to live-on behind closed doors within households and particular spiritual leaders.  The reemergence of both practices is growing at a rapid rate worldwide.

Yoga and Ayurveda are intimately connected and often hard to separate.  Ayurveda is the healing and therapeutic branch of yoga, also known as Yoga Chikitsa.  Yoga is the spiritual aspect of Ayurveda.  Yoga as an individual practice is known as Yoga Sadhana.  When we use yoga as a medical therapy (i.e. when students come to yoga studios because they’ve been advised by a doctor or because of their own volition to find relief from stress, pain in the body, chronic backache, etc) this is traditionally considered Ayurveda.  In addition, the Ayurveda view of the mind and psychology stems from Yoga philosophy, thus making the practices and exercises for the mind the same.

While “yoga” has become a more integrated part of the western lexicon, Ayurveda still is yet to be discovered, or used, in the same way.  For Ayurveda practitioners like myself, this is both a blessing and a challenge.  A blessing because it means the competition is low and the potential number of people to educate is massive.  The challenge is…the same thing.  That is why Breathe. Connect. Be. was created.  To educate as many people as possible.  So stay tuned!

The Similarities between Yoga and Ayurveda:

  • Life sciences (study and practice of the human experience in relationship to other lives)
  • Acknowledges humans have an intimate connection with Nature
  • We are all connected and are endowed with life through a force and source of energy called Prana.
  • Wisdom designed to help people stay vital while realizing their full human potential.
  • Providing guidelines on ideal daily practices, behaviors, exercises, proper use of the senses,
  • Health is the balanced and dynamic integration between our environment, body, mind, and spirit.
  • Mantra, or sound, are used to balance the mind.
  • When the whole body is balanced (body and mind), we become more at peace with ourselves (spirit) and the world around us.  From this state of internal well-being, you will naturally begin to make wiser choices for your livelihood.
  • There are four main goals of every human’s life: Dharma (purpose, duty), Artha (wealth, prosperity), Kama (desires) and Moksha (liberation).

The Differences:

  • Ayurveda provides guidelines on ideal diet per individual constitution and health conditions.  Yoga has general sweeping recommendations based on the principle observances (eight limbs) of yoga.
  • Ayurveda uses specific asana (postures) as therapy for illness and dis-ease.  Yoga uses asana to redirect energy in our bodies for spiritual awakening or self-realization.  As you might here in India, “same same but different.”
  • Ayurveda outlines a variety of aromatherapy, gem therapy and herbal remedies for illness and dis-ease.  Yoga does not.
  • Ayurveda is a complete system of medicine (refer to What is Ayurveda? blog).  Yoga is a path of spiritual awakening.  Through the path of yoga is deep healing…mostly because when you feel better you begin to make better choices.

In short, Ayurveda provides us daily, seasonal and age-specific guidelines on how to best live according to our Nature, or constitution.  Ayurveda’s main focus is balancing the physical body and mind.  Yoga’s main focus is balancing the mind and expanding the mind to discover deeper truths about one’s self.  When practiced together, they create a whole system of life science medicine which is practical for anyone, at any stage of health or life.

Examples of conditions transformed through the integration of Yoga and Ayurveda: Emotional conditions, chronic back pain, chronic neck pain, irritable bowl syndrome, acid-reflux disorder/GERD, headaches, migraine headaches, menstrual problems or irregularities, low energy, stress, hypertension, anger, anxiety, neuropathy, lifestyle diseases (diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity), dis-empowering life patterns and habits, underweight, joint pain, post-surgery care, poor concentration and depression.

Benefits of Yoga and Ayurveda:

  • Deep Relaxation
  • Reduced stress & tension
  • Increased self-esteem & confidence
  • Better coordination
  • Weight loss
  • Flexibility
  • Stronger bones and toned muscles
  • Overcoming limiting patterns in your life
  • Breaking habits that do not serve you in your Highest
  • Inner-Peace
  • Balance to your overall Life Knowing your inner Self more intimately
  • Becoming more connected with Nature and its cycles
  • Deeper understanding and living your Dharma (life’s purpose…again, an individual discovery only YOU can uncover)
  • Deeper understanding and integration of the four human goals: Dharma (purpose, duty), Artha (wealth, prosperity), Kama (desires) and Moksha (liberation).

*The fist written records of Ayurveda and Yoga date back to 3,000 BCE

References

Frawley, David.  Yoga & Ayurveda, Self-Healing and Self-Realization. Twin Lakes: Lotus Press, 1999. Print.

Frawley, David.  Ayurveda and the Mind, The Healing of Consciousness.  Twin Lakes: Lotus Press, 1996.  Print.

Note: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is a reference work.  It is not meant for diagnosis or treatment and it is not substitute for consultation with a licensed health care professional.

 

What does it mean to be “Healthy”?

These days, “yoga” is a household term in the United States, while the term Ayurveda is still unknown.  Ayurveda, yoga’s sister science, is also Sanskrit and means Science or Wisdom of Life.  It is the oldest and most complete holistic mind-body medicine still practiced on this planet.  The ancient texts and complete medical books of Ayurveda are over 5,000 years old!  Yes, even Chinese Medicine has its roots in Ayurveda.  Ayurveda and yoga are two of many ancient wisdom traditions that have laid the successful path of self discovery, awareness and transformation.   Together they are a complementary medical system that helps us to understand ourselves from all levels of existence: physical, emotional, mental, higher/spiritual self and Soul Self.  The image above is a visual guideline of this roadmap showing the interconnectedness between self and others and how your personal health and wellbeing can affect others.

Ayurveda gives us guidance and blue prints of what it means to be a Whole Being.  It is the same map that helps one to understand what it means to be healthy.  This road-map to wholeness and wellbeing is called “Swasthavritta” or the science of being established in one’s self.  Ayurveda acknowledges each person as an unique individual with different needs AND at the same time is part of a massive whole (like the image above).  Ayurveda celebrates the connection of physical, sensory, mental, spiritual AND social wellbeing!  Yes, you heard me right, SOCIAL wellbeing!  Recognizing that individual health is just the starting point and social health is a direct reflection of healthy people coming together in union, or yoga.

You might be asking yourself, “Established in one’s self?  Don’t I live with myself each day?”

True, however, are you at peace and acceptance with yourself each day?  Do you make mindful choices and decisions about food, beverage, recreation, medicine, work and relationships that support your Whole Being and, thus, your family and community’s wellbeing?  Do you know Who you are at the core of your being?  I truly believe that each person on this planet is here to understand this question and to discover it for him or herself.  According to Ayurveda, to be healthy means to have awareness and make choices that support and nurture your Whole Being—body, mind and spirit.

The concept of being established in one’s self as part of a medical system truly paves a way for a global paradigm shift in what it means to be healthy.  Healthy is not just being pain or disease free.  It’s more than that.  Healthy is swasthavritta, being established in one’s self.  Healthy is recognizing that each decision you make affects the whole, including your family and society’s wellbeing.  This ancient wisdom has many keys that can help unlock our current medical structure and evolve medicine to new horizons where people come first, not their disease.

I invite you to take a deeper look at the visual map of whole being, or well-being, above.  May you find many “aha!” moments, healing moments and inner-smiles as you begin to contemplate swasthavritta and your own life.

Aloha & Namaste.

What is Ayurveda?

Airuuveeda? huh?

Let’s start at the beginning.   Say it with  me. “Eye-ru” “Vay-duh”…”eye-ru-vay-duh.”

Ayurveda is a word from the Sanskrit language of old India.   Ayur = Life   Veda = Science, Wisdom or The Way.  Therefore, Ayurveda is the Science of Life.  Its origins date back to 1000-700 B.C.E. and continues to be a tradition of professional practice, research and education world-wide.  In India, it is an inseparable part of the culture and daily living.

Today, the word and practice of yoga is more well known.  In fact, in Southern California where I currently live, yoga has become one of the hottest commodities and businesses.  Ayurveda on the other hand is still relatively unknown.  Traditionally, the practices of Ayurveda and Yoga were inseparable.  Inseparable because Ayurveda is considered to be Yoga’s sister-science.  They are complementary systems that address the whole person, body, mind and spirit towards wise living or how to live a long and healthy life.  The ancient wisdom of Ayurveda informs us of daily health and wellness practices that, like yoga, also relieves the mind and body from attachments, unhealthy desires, habits, stagnation or poor health.

Ayurveda honors you as a whole, unique person (body, mind and spirit) who is deeply connected to nature.  Nature expresses itself slightly differently in each person, thereby creating diversity and individuality of physique, personality and even how you respond to stress.  By determining your particular “constitution,” or prakriti, a well-trained practitioner of Ayurveda can offer specific lifestyle solutions (exercise, yoga poses, stretches, activities, daily routines), dietary recommendations, herbal remedies, breathing exercises, aromatherapy and mantras (or sacred sounds).  In the past, and in most parts of India that I traveled to in 2007, Ayurveda and Yoga are practiced together.  They are practiced together to help bring the whole-body into health, balance and inner peace by reducing suffering, pain and relieving physical and energetic stagnation.  Traditionally, a person would spend years practicing and living a lifestyle as prescribed by a Doctor of Ayurvedic before he/she would begin their path of yoga.

One of the most fascinating things I learned during my formal studies of Ayurveda through the Kerala Ayurveda Academy was how detailed, developed and in-depth Ayurveda medicine is in its original form.  While most Ayurveda, as practiced primarily  in the United States are day-to-day activities and choices each one of us can do, Ayurveda is a whole and complete medical system developed in what is now India by the most enlightened physicians and surgeons.  In its entirety, Ayurveda has eight departments of medicine including:  Internal Medicine, Surgery, Ear, Nose, Eyes and Throat Diseases, Pediatrics, Toxicology, Psychiatry, Science of Rejuvenation and Science of Aphrodisiacs (fertility).  Did you know the first records of plastic surgery, particularly rhinoplasy, come from ancient Ayurveda medical texts dating back to 600 B.C.E.?  Rhinoplasty was used to reconstruct noses damaged in battle.

Like I mentioned earlier, despite its age, Ayurveda is practiced around the world today.  In the United States, Ayurveda is not a licensed practice (at least not yet), so most trained practitioners use Ayurveda in combination with other licenses such as Physical Therapy, Western Biomedicine, Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture, Chiropractic Medicine or Massage Therapy.  A few trained in Ayurveda use their certification to start a small business as a health coach or in combination with teaching yoga.  For me, I use Ayurveda with all my clients in-person and long distance via Skype or Google+.

Who is Ayurveda for?  Individuals and families who appreciate being acknowledged as a whole person (not their disease) should consider Ayurveda.  It offers natural ways of treating dis-ease and focuses on promoting health by helping you determine foods, drinks, exercises and other lifestyle solutions that will help you at the root-level of health and well-being.  More importantly for modern times, it is complementary to most western medical treatments.  Herbal remedies should be carefully analyzed for potentially dangerous drug-herb interactions by a qualified licensed healthcare provider.  Because Ayurveda focuses on empowering you to take responsibility for your own well-being, most people find after they integrate individual recommendations they begin to have fewer health issues overall and have more energy for the parts of life they enjoy.

Others who might benefit from Ayurveda include:

  • Parents of children who have chronic health conditions
  • Individuals with chronic health conditions that are not improving under other medical care
  • Individuals who understand the importance of PREVENTION
  • Yoga instructors and other holistic health care practitioners

References:

Textbook of Ayurvedic Medicine. Published by Kerala Ayurveda Academy.  2009.

Frawley, David.  Yoga & Ayurveda, Self-Healing and Self-Realization. Twin Lakes: Lotus Press, 1999. Print.

Svoboda, Robert E. Prakruti, Your Ayurvedic Constitution.  Albuquerque: Geocom Limited, 1989.  Print.

Tiwari, Maya.  Ayurveda, A Life of Balance.  Rochester: Healing Arts Press, 1995.  Print.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is a reference work.  It is not meant for diagnosis or treatment and it is not substitute for consultation with a licensed health care professional.

What’s your Passion?

Last night I rediscovered “What’s your Passion?” from past blogs on an older website.  On the memorial date that changed the world’s events forever, and thus our lives, I felt it was appropriate to repost it.  Especially now as the spouse of an active duty Marine Corps Infantry Officer, I find this post more meaningful than when I first wrote it.   May you continue to find gratitude in all parts of your life including the stranger or person standing next to you.  Every-body is extraordinary with an extraordinary story.  

February 7, 2010 by Haunani Chong

About two weeks ago I was truly blessed to attend a reception sponsored by the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine with special guest Naomi Judd in San Diego, California.  The reception, titled  “Journey into Healing,” turned out to be spiritually uplifting and confirmed the path I’m walking on now and the path that lies before me.

Starting off as an inspirational speech, inviting doctors to consider the more subtle aspects of whole-being (like emotional and spiritual health), the reception turned into a night of promoting and advocating integrative health and wellness solutions for ALL, including our service men, women and veterans.

Towards the end of an hour-long, interactive, and surprising, funny speech, Miss Judd concluded by reading a letter from her lifelong friend.  Miss Judd’s friend was a mother who watched her son’s life change, transform, and eventually end because he chose to live his life’s purpose (dharma)—serving in our Country’s military.  This letter was brutally honest, heart wrenching and at the same time life-promoting.  What struck my heart-chords the most was the line, “Will my country ever learn to love the way he loved for our country?”  Tears filled my eyes.

For the past two weeks I’ve taken this same question personally.  Will I ever learn to love the way he loved for my country and me?  I am touched by this young gentleman’s selflessness.  He was willing to sacrifice it all for my freedom.  And yours.  My freedom to be here now writing this blog, to attend a post-graduate degree in Asian Medicine, to teach yoga and to have the ability to share my ideas and thoughts in public.  That’s love, unconditional love—to serve in a way that allows others to live their dreams.

So, what’s your love?

My love is humanity.  My love is you.  My love is medicine.  My calling is to serve all of humanity by improving medicine by integrating holistic mind-body solutions into clinics, hospitals and all lives, especially the military system.

Today, I ask you: what do you love so much that you’d be willing to sacrifice it all?

The First of Many

Breathe.  Connect.  Be. came to me a few months ago during a meditation.  So much for really stilling the mind, right?!  Haha.  That’s typically how my “meditations” go.  Nonetheless, here it is Breathe.  Connect.  Be.  A new blog dedicated to uplifting you to your highest potential through education, inspiration, humor, honesty and passion.

What you’ll find are articles, videos, photos, how to’s, and links on the topics of: Yoga, Ayurveda, Chinese Medicine, holistic living, holistic health and wellness solutions for all ages, Feng Shui, Meditation, motivation, Integrated Medicine and real life experiences.

Who is Breathe.  Connect.  Be. for?  Primarily YOU!  It’s no coincidence you found this page, or this page found you-a matter of perspective or belief.  However, if you found something helpful, heartful, wise or just plane unbelievable or insane, PLEASE SHARE IT!  Add it to your Facebook, Twitter, blog, next group email or even as a gift to someone.

Specifically, you may have been drawn here for one of the following reasons because:

  • you feel a deep calling to change something in their life.
  • you are sick or have been diagnosed with a disease or illness and is looking for another option.
  • you are looking for a like-minded community or connection to others who also appreciate a holistic way of life.
  • you need a laugh…or a cry.
  • you are a yoga teacher and want to learn more.
  • you are an editor and want to republish something on this blog.
  • you are passionate about humanity.
  • you love life.
  • a friend recommended this blog site to you…you should read more and figure out why.
  • you need inspiration for your own blog, clinic or work.
  • you are searching…again, it’s no coincidence you found this blog.

Regardless of why you are here, my intention is to share my authentic self and experiences with you.

In a very influential time in my life I read a quote from Mohandas Gandhi which read “My life is my message.” My life changed forever.  From that day forward, I dedicated my life to uncovering, discovering, learning and living a life that was in alignment with what I valued in myself, others, the Earth and eventually the presence of something higher than myself.  I decided I wanted to live a life that served others and created positive, mindful and well-intentioned footprints on this World.  From a young 20 year old who thought she had it all as the Restaurant manager of a four-star fine dining restaurant, to the yogi who lived in the jungle, to the weak and out of balance shaved-head girl who preferred to sleep on the ground, to the strong and energetic business professional and now wife of a United States Marine Corps Infantry Officer, I’m living a life that is dedicated to respecting and loving each person as a WHOLE AMAZING BEING (body, mind and spirit) that is an integral, much needed and unique gift to this World. Each one of us is here with unique and varied paths and journeys.  It’s not for me to make everyone choose the path I did or even pretend I know what someone else’s path is.  What I have discovered along my own path are tools and little gems that have turned suffering into freedom, aggression into love and abuse into forgiveness.  To not share these gems and tools would be selfish.  Choosing a life of adventure, Truth, Soul searching, healing and radiance was, and is still, the best path I ever decided to take. Like the famous poem of Robert Frost proclaimed “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.”

May you always remember to Breathe.  Connect. and Be.

Aloha & Namaste,
Haunani